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Review: Prophecy presents: Joe Ford and Memtrix

reviewI:MreviewComment
Review: Prophecy presents: Joe Ford and Memtrix

Blue Mountain is currently undergoing some form of underworld renaissance.

In early August the club proudly advertised that they were planning on booking myriad unique events for Bristol’s second half of the year.

The club’s prediction has been proven, and Prophecy is the latest addition to a growing number of new nights comfortably hosted in the approachable yet capacious venue.

Source: Prophecy

Source: Prophecy

 

After descending into the brisk evening’s harbourside mist, I merged into a steadily busy queue of committed heads.

 

Though reflecting the weather’s sombre mood under bright jackets; judging by an array of torn-up trainers, punters were clearly conserving their energy for a concussive session of sound within.

 

Prophecy’s minimalistic design places emphasis on the artists themselves playing, in contrast to a plethora of themed events like Shak Out.

 

Though formatting an event based on a style can be successful, Prophecy (much like a smaller Hospitality) succeeds because it maintains focus on the artists and their productions, not on set-up or decorations.

 

 

That’s not to say the visuals were bland, though, as the spectacular projectors in Blue Mountain were used to full effect, streaking the walls with colourful artist logos.

Upon entrance with Exposure on deck duty, I found MC Texas at the bar, looking very happy to be going up and getting the crowd energised for Jackpot B2B Tommy B.

A little shot of jump-up flavour is welcome for an hour.

Just one though, I’m glad it didn’t persist as Joe Ford’s funky halftime steppers and rolling riffs were much more suited to the mood.

Memtrix                                        Source: UKF

Memtrix                                        Source: UKF

 

Memtrix blended a huge spread of styles ranging between 160-180BPM perfectly.

 

Alongside Joe Ford, this combination of frequencies and rhythms shows Prophecy isn’t afraid to try something new.

 

There was never a boring moment on the dance floor this night.

 

 

Partly due to a slightly lacklustre sound system which loses power at the very low-end, I found myself needing a reprieve from an assault of treble-heavy synth-step.

I ventured upstairs upstairs into a warmer, smoky atmosphere.

Here there was lower-volume jungle and dubstep was being spun by Dedman, Cousin It, Bendi, and Odinn B alongside Prophecy residents Bonni & Clippa.

Source: Best of Bristol

Source: Best of Bristol

 

A roots and grime infused remix of Chase & Status’ ‘Hitz’ seemed to act as catnip for ravers, as a steady stream of people began flooding the upstairs area.

 

I had split my time evenly in Blue Mountain’s caves, not expecting the smaller names to carry as much weight.

 

However, though the big headliners smashed their respective sets, I was more impressed by how these artists were just as good.

 

Though no date is set, Prophecy’s third night is just around the corner, and we’re told one of Bristol’s biggest producers is set to headline.

 

 

 

The Prophecy brand will continue to bring in big names, but we hope that a sprinkle of lesser-known producers will still be teaming up to test a mid-size club’s electronics to the limit.


Written by Tristan Davis - Underground Writer